Engaging Communications with Older Adults

Many conditions can cause communication problems in adults, including dementia, strokes, brain injuries, Huntington’s disease, and ALS. Medications can also affect memory, which can in turn affect comprehension.

Thanks to advances in technology, total hip replacement has become a widespread procedure for many older adults to address severe hip joint pain caused by arthritis and injuries. The procedure for most people is low risk and offers more independence and a greater quality of life after recovery. To ensure success, it is important to reduce risk factors that may lead a person to be readmitted to the hospital after the procedure.

In-home care providers can offer companionship as they assist seniors with the tasks of daily living. While they help with homemaking and personal care, in-home care providers can offer seniors a listening, understanding ear and someone to talk with. And when homemaking and personal care tasks are completed, an in-home care provider can share in a senior’s favorite pastimes.

In-home care providers help senior citizens continue living independently in their own homes, assisting them with the routine tasks of homemaking and personal care. And that frees up more time for seniors to do the things they enjoy. More seniors are directing their interests and talents to volunteer opportunities. They are discovering great fulfillment and purpose in helping others.

Aphasia is a communication disorder that occurs when the language centers of the brain sustain damage from illness, dementia, or injury. In seniors, the most common cause of aphasia is stroke. Victims of aphasia have difficulty communicating with others and may also have difficulty comprehending what others are saying, and this difficulty can be quite severe or very mild, almost unnoticeable.

There are many preventable actions that seniors and their families can take to ensure their safety and the safety of their loved ones. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that injuries, many of which are preventable, are the leading cause of disability and death for people of all ages.

Many studies indicate that although dementia patients experience severe or chronic pain, they regularly receive fewer analgesics than healthy senior adults. This can primarily be attributed to the fact that while a healthy senior can verbalize pain and discomfort, dementia patients, especially those in the late stages, cannot.

4 to 6 percent of Canadians experience a form of depression called winter-onset Seasonal Affective Disorder *(SAD). Another 10 to 20 percent have milder cases. Many mistakenly write off SAD as the winter blues or cabin fever, but as a recognized type of clinical depression, SAD requires professional diagnosis and attention, the Canadian Mental Health Association advises.

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