Preparing Seniors for Natural Disasters

If you are the caregiver for an older family member, you may need to help your loved one get ready for unexpected events. Since most people over the age of 50 report that they are not prepared for natural disasters, it may fall to families and healthcare providers to help older adults become proactive in their emergency plans. Our older population is most vulnerable at a time of crisis, so getting prepared today means a faster response time and less stress in the future.

One key to finding high-nutrient foods for seniors and elders is easy: color. A colorful plate with a variety of vegetables and fruits each day will boost your intake of important nutrients. Look for a mix of fruits and vegetables and fill your plate with these valuable foods.

Besides keeping stress under control, time management for seniors offers these benefits: ensures that we have time for the activities that mean the most to us, prevents us from over-scheduling our time, helps us maintain balance in our lives, and saves us time.

In-home caregiving for seniors describes continuing to live at home and having caregivers come to you. With more and more companies now providing home care services, such as Comfort Keepers, seniors and their families have a much easier time finding just the right provider to meet their specific needs. In-home caregiving is flexible to meet changing needs and provides true independence for seniors.

There are over 1.5 million Canadians who have been diagnosed with Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and as many as 1.6 million more Canadians may have COPD but remain undiagnosed. It is the fourth leading cause of death in Canada and the leading cause of hospitals admisision for chronic medical conditions. COPD is a result of damage to the lungs, most commonly caused by smoking, and is usually a mix of two diseases, bronchitis and emphesyma, that affect the person’s ability to breathe.

Recovering from a health episode that lands you in the hospital can be challenging for the best of us, but for seniors who are socially isolated and struggling with loneliness, readjustment can be especially tricky—isolation and loneliness just may increase the odds that they will end up returning to the hospital with a recurring health episode.

Each year, one third of seniors aged 65 or older suffers a fall. While falling may seem a rather benign occurrence for most young and not-so-young people, the effects on older seniors can often be devastating financially and physically.

Elder abuse encompasses a wide range of mistreatment, including physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, abandonment, and neglect. It most often comes from family members, friends, or surprisingly, even the seniors themselves in the form of self-neglect. Unfortunately, it is also greatly under-reported with one study estimating that only 1 in 14 cases is ever brought to the attention of authorities, medical professionals, or social service providers.

The importance of good nutrition spans the generations, but as we age, our dietary requirements change. Seniors need to concentrate on eating foods with a high nutrient density—that is, whole, natural, fresh foods that are packed with essential nutrients and fiber, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, legumes, healthy sources of protein and low-fat dairy products.

Studies indicate engaging in daily life activities can have far-reaching benefits for seniors and elders. Shopping, for example, is a daily life activity that can stimulate cognitive processes, provide physical benefits, and function as a leisure pursuit that promotes social engagement.

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