Keeping Seniors with Alzheimer’s Safe Room-by-Room

Ensuring that your senior loved one remains as self-sufficient as possible, and yet safe around the house requires a delicate balance. For those caring for a person with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia, that challenge increases ten-fold. Caregivers providing care for someone with Alzheimer’s must be diligent about identifying potential dangers in the home.

If you or your loved one is over age 65, it’s likely that getting enough sleep has become an issue. Seniors typically take longer to fall asleep, and often wake up during the night numerous times. These are two main reasons many seniors don’t get as much sleep as they need.

Many conditions can cause communication problems in adults, including dementia, strokes, brain injuries, Huntington’s disease, and ALS. Medications can also affect memory, which can in turn affect comprehension.

Thanks to advances in technology, total hip replacement has become a widespread procedure for many older adults to address severe hip joint pain caused by arthritis and injuries. The procedure for most people is low risk and offers more independence and a greater quality of life after recovery. To ensure success, it is important to reduce risk factors that may lead a person to be readmitted to the hospital after the procedure.

In-home care providers can offer companionship as they assist seniors with the tasks of daily living. While they help with homemaking and personal care, in-home care providers can offer seniors a listening, understanding ear and someone to talk with. And when homemaking and personal care tasks are completed, an in-home care provider can share in a senior’s favorite pastimes.

As a caregiver, how do you protect your senior loved one from falling victim to scams? Protecting your senior comes down to four key actions: being aware, being careful, doing your homework, and asking for help if you find that your senior has been the victim of a financial crisis.

Many seniors and their loved ones have come to expect that some hearing loss is inevitable. While it’s true that gradual hearing loss is not uncommon, especially after age 65, there are actions we can take while we’re younger to ward off its severity.

Aphasia is a communication disorder that occurs when the language centers of the brain sustain damage from illness, dementia, or injury. In seniors, the most common cause of aphasia is stroke. Victims of aphasia have difficulty communicating with others and may also have difficulty comprehending what others are saying, and this difficulty can be quite severe or very mild, almost unnoticeable.

There are many preventable actions that seniors and their families can take to ensure their safety and the safety of their loved ones. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that injuries, many of which are preventable, are the leading cause of disability and death for people of all ages.

Art therapy has been shown to have a direct impact on individuals’ wellness and can help the elderly adapt to changes and loss brought on by age and/or illness. By engaging in creative activities such as painting, drawing, clay work and sculpting, jewelry making, scrap booking, and so forth, seniors have a channel for expression.

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