Alzheimer’s is considered a form of dementia, a group of symptoms associated with the loss of cognitive and behavioral functioning, which ultimately interfere with daily life. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, since 2000, heart disease-related deaths have decreased 14%, while Alzheimer’s-related deaths have increased 89%.

Senior breast cancer: It’s estimated that 1 in 9 Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime – making it the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and an important risk for senior caregivers to be aware of.

Spotting depression in Canada’s seniors and elders: according to the National Network of Depression Centers (NNDC), of those who are treated for depression, approximately 80% show improvement in symptoms 4-6 weeks after treatment.

Senior fire safety: according to the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association), the leading cause of fire deaths in the home for adults 65 years of age and older is smoking. The second leading cause is heating equipment.

A study in 2012 showed that senior men and women 70 and older, who were recovering from disability, were 44% more likely to recover fully due to positive attitude toward aging. Read more about the importance of seniors and elders having a healthy attitude towards aging.

While it’s often recommended that we eat five-to-seven servings of fruits and vegetables each day, the CDC suggests that it could be as much as 13 for seniors and elders, depending on age, gender, and physical activity.

One of the most severe respiratory diseases, one that primarily affects people between the age of 65 and 74, is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). According to Statistics Canada there are over 1.5 million Canadians who have been diagnosed with COPD.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strongly encourage older adults to be immunized in order to help reduce the risk of getting (and spreading) serious, often life-threatening disease. Frequency of immunization depends on the disease and the individual.

Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common age-related problem. According to the National Center of Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the prevalence of dysphagia in persons 50 years of age and older is between 15-22%.

As we age, it’s important to maintain physical well-being, but often times, psychological, emotional, and social health can fall by the wayside due to increased isolation. Scientific and health communities have, for many years, viewed isolation as detrimental to the overall wellbeing of older adults.

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