More than 15 percent of Canadians 65 and older now have Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) according to the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada, and 95% percent of all elderly people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias had at least one other chronic medical condition. This article helps elder caregivers who are assisting seniors with Alzheimer’s or other chronic conditions and diseases.

At least 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men will suffer from an osteoporotic fracture during their lifetime. Our goal for bone health should be to keep as much bone as possible for the rest of our lives. We can take action now to prevent bone loss and watch for warning signs of a more serious condition.

Pet therapy has been shown to be particularly helpful to Alzheimer’s patients and those affected by other dementias. Pets, and dogs in particular, can calm those affected by dementia, help them stay active, and help them stay social through interactions with passersby who cannot resist these fuzzy companions.

Insomnia and the inability to stay asleep are common complaints of older adults. While it is not uncommon for older adults to sleep more lightly than they did when they were younger, they still need a good night’s sleep. Having insomnia or feeling sleepy throughout the day could be indicative of underlying problems.

Ensuring senior adults are actively involved in their own health and wellbeing is a priority for health professionals and policy makers. Many of the difficulties associated today with growing older are preventable or at least manageable. Adults can grow older and remain active by making choices that benefit their overall health.

If you are the caregiver for an older family member, you may need to help your loved one get ready for unexpected events. Since most people over the age of 50 report that they are not prepared for natural disasters, it may fall to families and healthcare providers to help older adults become proactive in their emergency plans. Our older population is most vulnerable at a time of crisis, so getting prepared today means a faster response time and less stress in the future.

Every year over the age of 40, our metabolism slows. Though our nutritional requirements stay almost the same as younger adults, our energy needs decrease. To keep our bodies feeling good and functioning well, we need to be aware of how our diet needs are evolving as we age. Every stage of life brings changes to our bodies, and taking an active role in diet and nutrition can mean more energy and better disease prevention in the future.

One key to finding high-nutrient foods for seniors and elders is easy: color. A colorful plate with a variety of vegetables and fruits each day will boost your intake of important nutrients. Look for a mix of fruits and vegetables and fill your plate with these valuable foods.

Besides keeping stress under control, time management for seniors offers these benefits: ensures that we have time for the activities that mean the most to us, prevents us from over-scheduling our time, helps us maintain balance in our lives, and saves us time.

In-home caregiving for seniors describes continuing to live at home and having caregivers come to you. With more and more companies now providing home care services, such as Comfort Keepers, seniors and their families have a much easier time finding just the right provider to meet their specific needs. In-home caregiving is flexible to meet changing needs and provides true independence for seniors.

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