A healthy diet delivers essential nutrients for optimal health and plays an essential role in improving the quality of life and independence of senior citizens. According to the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health, good nutrition may help seniors slow the onset of many diseases, manage the symptoms of chronic illness, lessen the impact of disease on lifestyle and boost longevity.

Hunger and malnutrition is a greater problem for Canada’s seniors than many may realize—and it is due to a wide variety of causes, not just financial constraints. According to a report by FoodBanks Canada seniors accounted for 5.5% of food bank clients in a typical month.

Medication works only when it is taken. And it is most effective when taken according to a doctor’s prescription or, in the case of nonprescription medications, label directions. Complying with prescriptions becomes increasingly difficult for seniors as the number of medications they must take increases. The problem is magnified for seniors who have conditions that diminish their cognitive abilities.

Senior foot care: foot injury, neglect, and disease are major factors contributing to mobility, or lack thereof, in elders, and senior adults tend to experience more problems with their feet than younger adults simply because they have used them for longer.

For many seniors today, the “golden years” can be incredibly stressful times. What causes seniors so much stress? Change is a major trigger, and seniors experience plenty of change.

Caregiving is an emotional subject which is likely the reason so many myths surround it. This article focuses on dispelling some of these caregiving myths. It’s a must-read for anyone currently involved in caregiving including those who are considering hiring or perhaps even becoming a caregiver.

Seniors are at a greater risk of drug interactions than the general population as they typically take more medications. A 2008 study by the Canadian Institute for Health Information stated that almost two-thirds of Canadian seniors are taking five or more types of prescription drugs. The study further found that at least one in 25 older Canadians take drugs in potentially harmful combinations.

A well-balanced, heart-healthy diet—rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains—reduces plaque build-up in the arteries to deliver a free-flowing stream of oxygen to all parts of the body, including the brain.

A nutritious diet is especially important for seniors’ health. That is because a variety of factors puts older adults at greater risk of malnutrition, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. These factors include chronic disease, physical disability, isolation,limited income and medications that limit nutrient absorption.

In Canada alone there are more than 750,000 people living with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. One-in-five Canadians age 45 and over are providing some form of care to seniors who have long-term health problems. These unpaid family members are performing a great service to both the individuals with dementia and society as a whole, but they pay a hefty price with their own wellbeing and an increased financial burden.

© Copyright 2021, Comfort Keepers®Privacy Policy | Code of Ethics
To visit our international sites, select from the drop-down :