Keeping the minds and social connections of our senior loved ones active is every bit as important to as caring for their physical wellbeing. Senior citizens don’t have to slow down or stop feeling young at heart just because they are older. As a caregiver, there are many fun, low cost and even free activities you can help your senior get involved with so that he or she can enjoy being socially engaged all year round.

Ensuring that your senior loved one remains as self-sufficient as possible, and yet safe around the house requires a delicate balance. For those caring for a person with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia, that challenge increases ten-fold. Caregivers providing care for someone with Alzheimer’s must be diligent about identifying potential dangers in the home.

More Canadians are choosing to “age in place.” That is, they opt to stay in their homes rather than move to alternative retirement settings. But that often means they must modify their homes so it’s not a danger to their safety and health when their physical abilities change.

Aging normally involves a certain degree of memory loss. But what degree of memory loss in seniors and elders is normal, and what is cause for concern? This article gives advice to caregivers for identifying memory issues in seniors.

Many of Canada’s seniors and elders have to manage multiple prescriptions, sometimes upwards of 5 prescriptions daily. It is vital for a senior’s health that he or she take the proper dosage of their medication.

If you or your loved one is over age 65, it’s likely that getting enough sleep has become an issue. Seniors typically take longer to fall asleep, and often wake up during the night numerous times. These are two main reasons many seniors don’t get as much sleep as they need.

As a caregiver, it’s important to know that a little alcohol goes a long way as we age, even for senior adults who do not have any particular health issues. As people get older, we become more sensitive to alcohol’s effects.

As more and more older adults are choosing to age in place, the need for home modifications to accommodate physical changes in people is growing. Ideally, homes for aging adults would meet universal design standards, which make structures inherently accessible to older people and those with disabilities. Many homeowners, however, hesitate to upgrade existing homes because of the cost.

Many conditions can cause communication problems in adults, including dementia, strokes, brain injuries, Huntington’s disease, and ALS. Medications can also affect memory, which can in turn affect comprehension.

Thanks to advances in technology, total hip replacement has become a widespread procedure for many older adults to address severe hip joint pain caused by arthritis and injuries. The procedure for most people is low risk and offers more independence and a greater quality of life after recovery. To ensure success, it is important to reduce risk factors that may lead a person to be readmitted to the hospital after the procedure.

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