An eye condition known as age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, can impact the severity of the vision loss that is due to aging. This is why it is important to know the basic facts about AMD. The good news is, these facts include preventive steps seniors can take to reduce the risk of developing AMD.

Changes in healthcare and advances in medicine have created a situation where patients are discharged from the hospital much sooner than previously. While the patients may be medically fit to return home, they are often not mentally and emotionally prepared for the in-home recovery process. Offering the appropriate support at home, however, can give patients a feeling of security and increase their chances of a successful recovery.

In the early stages of dementia, many seniors show less interest in what were once their favorite activities, and that can be hard on family and loved ones who want to help them. Routine activity, as long as it is carefully planned, can enrich the lives of those affected by dementia and support them in many ways .

As senior take more medications they run an increased risk of harmful drug interactions. They also are at greater risk of nutritional deficiencies that result when medications interact with certain foods or suppress appetite.

Senior nutrition and nutrient intake has a huge impact on the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease, making a brain-health diet extremely important for Canada’s seniors and elder care providers.

4 to 6 percent of Canadians experience a form of depression called winter-onset Seasonal Affective Disorder *(SAD). Another 10 to 20 percent have milder cases. Many mistakenly write off SAD as the winter blues or cabin fever, but as a recognized type of clinical depression, SAD requires professional diagnosis and attention, the Canadian Mental Health Association advises.

Food poisoning is especially detrimental to seniors, causing them to be sicker longer with more acute symptoms. As people age, their immune systems slow down and are not as effective in combating illnesses. For these reasons, it is critical that seniors and their caretakers are able to immediately identify the symptoms of food poisoning and seek proper medical care and treatment. It is equally important, or more so, that they follow safe food preparation and handling methods.

The Center for Disease Control reports that each year more than 200,000 people across North America will be hospitalized due to seasonal flu and its complications such as pneumonia—and 36,000 of them will die. Seniors make up the majority of these numbers. The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends that everyone be vaccinated for the seasonal flu virus as well as H1N1.

Falls are the leading cause of injury-related death among those age 75 and older. Once cold weather comes, seniors should be aware of their increased risk for falls. Snow and ice is a danger for anyone who ventures outdoors in winter, but it is especially unsafe for older adults for a variety of reasons.

Not all senior citizens are lucky enough to spend the winter in sunny locales like Florida or Arizona. Many seniors from northern climates stay put for the winter, doing their best to cope with the harsh weather. If you’re one of those seniors, you may be finding that getting through the cold is a bit more challenging than it used to be.

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