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What Canada’s seniors need to know about Glaucoma: More than 400,000 Canadians, and over 67 million people worldwide have glaucoma. Experts estimate that half of them don’t even know they have it.

Senior over-medication: 30–40% of Canada’s seniors take 5 or more medications on a regular basis. Of that group, about 10% of them take 10 or more drugs. Overmedication and taking multiple medications (technically called polypharmacy), are common and increasing to epidemic proportions among the senior population.

At least 1 in 8 Canadians seniors suffer from urinary incontinence according to a Stats Canada report. Bladder incontinence is a highly prevalent disease that not only affects a senior’s health, but impacts their daily lives emotionally, socially, and economically.

Respite care can benefit the health of both Canada’s seniors and their family caregivers. In a study, 60% of family caregivers, ages 19-64, reported “fair or poor” health and one or more chronic conditions or disabilities, compared with only 33% of non-caregivers.

It’s important to talk to your senior loved one about the signs of Alzheimer’s. As of 2016, there are an estimated 564,000 Canadians living with dementia – plus about 25,000 new cases diagnosed every year.

Depression is a common problem among older adults, but it is NOT a normal part of aging. In fact, studies show that most seniors feel satisfied with their lives, despite having more illnesses or physical problems. If you suspect that your loved one is suffering from depression, pay attention to these health indicators.

According to the Canadian Safety Council, older adults face fire risk factors which do not affect the young. Weaker physical (and sometimes mental) capabilities make it harder to identify and respond to a fire, and create a higher risk that a fire will start.

Both the characteristics of obesity and the way it affects seniors can be different when compared to how obesity impacts younger adults. This is very important to know, as it may determine if and how obesity should be analyzed and treated in seniors.

A total of about 4 million (1 in 8) Canadians are affected by a food-borne illness. Of these, there are about: 11,600 hospitalizations and 238 deaths. Canada’s seniors need to be aware of the risks of foodborne illnesses, understand these infection warning signs, and take these steps for preventing senior infection from foodborne illness.

Because there are seldom signs or symptoms of high blood cholesterol, many seniors are not aware that their cholesterol level may be too high. Among Canadians aged 6 to 79, 39% had an unhealthy level of total cholesterol. Seniors need to be aware of the dangers and warning signs, as well as these preventative measures.

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