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Anxiety Disorders in Canada’s Seniors

Late-life anxiety disorders are twice as prevalent as dementia among older adults, and four to eight times more prevalent than major depressive disorders. According to the National Institutes of Health, anywhere from 3 to 14 percent of older adults experience anxiety disorders in a given year. These disorders all involve excessive, irrational fear and can worsen if they are untreated.

Bereavement can have a devastating impact on the immune systems of seniors, and may explain why many older spouses soon die after the loss of their loved ones. Deep depression and an overwhelming feeling of helplessness are often a part of the grieving process, as well. It is, therefore, good to help the grieving loved one to cope during this difficult time.

Sundowning is a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, most often affecting people who have mid- and late-stage dementia. Confusion and agitation worsen in the late afternoon and evening when the sun goes down, and symptoms are less pronounced earlier in the day. Sundowning is also called “late-day confusion.”

What you can expect when your senior loved one returns home after a heart attack depends on its severity and the actual damage to the heart. Seniors over 65 may need eight weeks or more to fully recover, and are more prone to complications than younger patients. If your elder loved one has had a heart attack, it’s essential to understand the changes necessary for a successful recovery.

Nine important steps that can help Canadian Seniors and Elders with cancer prevention. The most significant risk factor for the development of cancer is aging; however, the risk of many types of cancer can be drastically reduced by focusing on these prevention steps.

When should you take the car keys away from your senior or elder loved ones? A and National Safety Council survey showed that 40 percent of adult children say they’re not comfortable talking to their parents about driving, and would rather discuss funeral arrangements or selling their home.

Nearly one in five Canadians adults — about 4.6 million people between the ages of 20 and 79 — has high blood pressure according to Statistics Canada, and gradual decline in memory and cognitive function can be attributed to elevated blood pressure. While there is no precise cause of cognitive impairment, an early indication of dementia, research strongly suggests that high blood pressure can add to the risk.

When the temperature drops, seniors and elders run a higher risk of health problems and injuries related to the weather. It’s important that they, and those who care for them, take certain precautions at this time of year. Here are some health hazards for seniors to avoid in winter.

Pneumonia is the 8th leading cause of death in Canada. While cases of pneumonia can range from mild to severe, seniors are much more susceptible to this disease than normal, healthy adults. If you are a caregiver for a Canada senior, it is essential to understand how to reduce the risk pneumonia in seniors, and spot the symptoms should they occur.

Canadian Census data showed that about one-quarter (24.6%) of the population aged 65 and over now live alone. Loneliness in seniors can cause early death as often as alcoholism, obesity, and heavy smoking. This article outlines tips for caregivers to identify and assist with senior depression in their elder loved ones.

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