Living with Arthritis

With more than 100 forms of arthritis and other rheumatic diseases, approximately one in three (33.8%) senior males and one in two (50.6%) senior females reported suffering from arthritis. Arthritis can prevent seniors from accomplishing the simplest tasks such a walking, preparing meals, picking up objects or even sitting for prolonged periods of time.

You have a senior with pneumonia who is about to be sent home to recover, and you are worried and because this person is over 65, her risk of readmission is greatly increased. A greater concern for you, though, is that the mortality rate for seniors with pneumonia is significantly greater than that in the younger population.

Healthy eating means eating a variety of foods that give you the nutrients you need to maintain your health, feel good, and have energy. For seniors, it may be particularly difficult for two reasons: they may have physical limitations that prevent them from preparing food regularly and they may believe they cannot afford to.

Numerous studies on the effects of alcohol consumption in seniors indicate that moderate drinking by seniors can have a positive impact on general health. However, there is also a concern that heavy drinking can have adverse effects, and that alcohol abuse is often missed in the senior population.

An eye condition known as age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, can impact the severity of the vision loss that is due to aging. This is why it is important to know the basic facts about AMD. The good news is, these facts include preventive steps seniors can take to reduce the risk of developing AMD.

Changes in healthcare and advances in medicine have created a situation where patients are discharged from the hospital much sooner than previously. While the patients may be medically fit to return home, they are often not mentally and emotionally prepared for the in-home recovery process. Offering the appropriate support at home, however, can give patients a feeling of security and increase their chances of a successful recovery.

As senior take more medications they run an increased risk of harmful drug interactions. They also are at greater risk of nutritional deficiencies that result when medications interact with certain foods or suppress appetite.

Senior nutrition and nutrient intake has a huge impact on the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease, making a brain-health diet extremely important for Canada’s seniors and elder care providers.

4 to 6 percent of Canadians experience a form of depression called winter-onset Seasonal Affective Disorder *(SAD). Another 10 to 20 percent have milder cases. Many mistakenly write off SAD as the winter blues or cabin fever, but as a recognized type of clinical depression, SAD requires professional diagnosis and attention, the Canadian Mental Health Association advises.

Food poisoning is especially detrimental to seniors, causing them to be sicker longer with more acute symptoms. As people age, their immune systems slow down and are not as effective in combating illnesses. For these reasons, it is critical that seniors and their caretakers are able to immediately identify the symptoms of food poisoning and seek proper medical care and treatment. It is equally important, or more so, that they follow safe food preparation and handling methods.

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